• "10 Things your Legal Document Management Team needs To Know Now"
  • "Document Conversion Guidelines"
  • "Volume Estimation Guide"
  • "Paperless Imaging Services Catalog"
  • "Cost comparisons in Legal Discovery"
  • "Guide to Selecting the Right Document Conversion Contractor"

Each of these articles can be found below....

10 Things your Legal Document Management Team needs to Know Now

1. A carefully defined objective must be established with the input of law firm attorneys and consultation from an experienced legal services contractor.

2. The top three priorites for the firm must be defined. Consider accuracy, timing, logistics, staff utilization, budget, judicial requirements, and storage/duplication needs.

3. Do not select a document conversion contractor until you have done your homework. Understand the project in its entirety and the details of the project workflow.

4. Limit your contractor selection to established businesses which specialize in working with law firms. Provide a consistent scope of work.

5. The pricing for complex paper scanning projects will involve several unique elements. A "one price fits all" contractor estimate will lead to problems at completion.

6. The pricing for paper scanning can range from $.02 to $1.00 a page based on the requirements of the project.

7. The items that cause your contractor the greatest difficulty include onsite work in tight areas, poorly packaged paper, poor condition paper, paper not sequentially delivered or readily available, onion-skin and carbon paper, irregular sized paper, folded paper, fragile paper, colored pencil/pen markups, poor indexing systems, 99.99% OCR accuracy, short time-frames, lack of communication, lack of client knowledge.

8. You can save your law firm money by providing vendors with detailed descriptions of the project including volumes, types, samples, photos, and accurate project scopes of work.

9. Paper scanning contractors generally classify projects as high-volume, low accuracy archival projects and low-volume, high accuracy projects and price accordingly. Look for high accuracy if you wish to receive a reliable product that has real value towards winning your law suit.

10. Contractors that have provided high quality paper scanning for litigation purposes in the past will understand your requirements and know how to satisfy them.

Back to Top





Document Conversion Guidelines
by Paperless Imaging Services

The considerations to be made by your law firm prior to the initiation of a document conversion project should be divided into the various aspects of the project. These include:
Document Logistics
Document Count
Document Preparation and Re-assembly
Paper Condition
Page Numbering or Bates Stamping
Indexing
Output
Quality Control / Quality Assurance

Document Logistics
It is important that the handling of the group of documents be evaluated in order to preserve and protect their integrity. Considerations include location of the documents and their organization; who will do any required organization; where will documents be stored; are there security considerations; is there microfilm/microfiche; can the documents be stored on-site for a long period; can the project be done on-site?

Document Count
An accurate estimate of the number of documents, document size, document
characteristics and condition is critical to determining the project manpower,
hardware, and software requirements. Vagueness or guestimates may lead to
overpricing. Consideration should be given to the total number of pages to be converted, whether by number of boxes, amount of shelving used, or number of file cabinet drawers; the number of documents single or double-sided; the size of the pages; any photographs and color or b/w; color scanning requirements; hand-writing capture; changes in the page count during the project.

Document Preparation and Re-assembly
You must determine the documents are to be handled to determine the
required manpower and level of expertise. Consider staff responsibilities for document preparation; handling of pages not to be scanned; scanning of sticky notes; document de-stapling, removal from binders/folders; any onion-skin or carbon paper documents; how to deal with poor quality originals; document preparation supervision; and re-assembly of documents.

Paper Condition
The quality and consistency of the paper, documents and boxes help determine
the degree of document preparation and ease of scanning? You will need to determine if all the paper is bond stock; if all documents are the same type; if there are any perforated forms or bound documents; are there damaged documents; and how many documents are stapled, clipped or fastened.

Page numbering
The ability to retrieve documents based on their page number or Bates stamp may
contribute to the overall utility and ease of use of your project. Determine if scanned pages need number or Bates stamping.

Indexing
Indexing is the process of assigning data elements (name, SSN, account, date, etc.)
to a document to speed later retrieval. This data is keystroked into each record as provided
by your firm. The amount to be indexed, the complexity and the source are important. Consider what index fields are required; the length of those fields; the type of data to be input; the source of the index data; if the indexing can be automated; and what level of accuracy is required (double-blind).

Output
Various levels of intelligent data retrieval using optical character recognition can be accomplished. Typical industry output is 90-95%. This means out of 100 pages 5 are not legible. A limited number of systems/vendors have approached perfection at 99.99% accuracy.Your specific needs dictate the level of OCR. You will need to determine how many words per page are critical; do some groups of pages require higher OCR accuracy; can some pages be simply scanned for storage.

Qualty Control / Quality Assurance
Each project demands different levels of quality control/ quality assurance. It is important that these levels be firmly established prior to the start of the project. Consider when the quality control/assurance measures occur, how often, by whom; what attributes of the scanned image will be checked; will the indexed fields be checked.

The development of a document conversion project requires extensive planning by those in charge. Training of the personnel is mandatory. Experience with similar projects is invaluable. As you consider a document conversion project as part of your litigation strategy you are encouraged to consult a support service that specializes in supporting the efforts of the legal profession. Paperless Imaging Services can help. It's all we do.

Back to Top







Volume Estimation Guidelines

The following will provide some assistance as you estimate the size and complexity of your paper scanning project:

Unbound paper equals approximately 150-175 pages per inch

A four-drawer vertical file cabinet holds approximately 12,000-16,000 pages

A lateral file cabinet holds approximately 5,500-6000 pages per drawer

A 12 x 15 "file box" holds approximately 2000-2500 pages

A "Bankers box" holds approximately 4500-5000 pages

A lineal foot of shelving holds approximately 1500-2000 pages

Color photos stacked count approximately 100-120 photos per inch

Engineering drawings (unfolded/unrolled) count approximately 125-150 sheets per inch

A 1" 3-ring binder holds approximately 250-275 pages

A 2" 3-ring binder holds approximately 450-480 pages

A 3" 3-ring binder holds approximately 650-670 pages

A 2-hole 2" binder holds approximately 450-480 pages

A "Velo-binder" holds approximately 200-300 pages per inch

Plastic coil / spiral binders hold approximately 175-200 pages

A 16 mm 24 X roll of microfilm holds approximately 2000-2400 pages

A 35 mm 12 X roll of microfilm holds approximately 1000 pages

A sheet of microfiche 24 X holds approximately 100 pages

Aperture cards count approximately 125-135 cards per inch

Back to Top








Paperless Imaging Services Catalog

Electronic Discovery Services
If you are preparing for initial electronic discovery, or going to trial, Paperless Imaging Services makes it easy by approaching each project with experience and innovation. Using our litigation support best practices approach, we can consult and review the special needs of your electronic discovery project, and suggest cost-saving ideas by utilizing our proven professional strengths.

Litigation Support Systems
Paperless Imaging Services can provide your law firm with electronic discovery, computer forensics, online hosting, litigation consulting and a project management skill set. We make collecting, reviewing and processing your electronic discovery data easy.

Our solutions to your litigation support needs:

- Enhanced electronic discovery

* Document analysis
* Scope of project review
* Detailed reporting
* Deliverables based on needs
* Data culling
* Removal of duplicates
* Annotations
* Resolution adjustments
* Cropping
* Watermarks
* Rotation
* Black Border Removal
* Deskewing
* Line Removal
* Noise removal
* Inverting (Polarity)
* Despeckle
* Mirror

- Searching and filtering

* Processing per your criteria
* Date/time selection/file extension/size selection
* Various search capabilities for captured text:
* Full text/phrase search
* Boolean search capabilities and constraints
* Wildcards
* Word stemming
* Adjustable Fuzzy search
* Phonic search
* Proximity and Directed Proximity search
* Stemming
* Numeric range
* Concept/Synonym/Thesaurus search
* Relevancy Ranking
* Term weighting
* Compound searching
* Forensics filtering


- Flexible deliverables: TIFF, PDF, native, metadata, text
- Data integration with document review systems
- Online Repositories
- Document Review and Screening
- Project Management

* Consultation
* Detailed project scope review
* Setup of culling criteria
* Document preparation and handling criteria
* Document re-assembly and delivery criteria

- Data Conversion with uniform printing & review formats
- Document Imaging (scanning to pdf/tiff/text plus image / bw, gray or color
- Document re-assembly/coding/labeling
- Document printing
- Document storage on CD/DVD
- On-Site or at Regional Center

Back to Top





Cost comparisons in Legal Discovery

DOCUMENT LOGISTICS
It is important that the handling of the group of documents be evaluated
in order to preserve and protect their integrity.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. What is the location of the original documents (paper/film/files) and
how will they be organized?
2. Who will do the organization of the original documents? Where?
3. Where will the documents be stored/staged prior to scanning?
4. Are there security considerations for the documents?
5. If there is microfilm/microfiche, are there environmental or
film quality considerations?
6. Is there sufficient space on-site for document preparation and batching
if it is to be done on-site?
7. Is there sufficient space on-site for document storage during scanning,
re-assembly, quality control, quality assurance and approval?

DOCUMENT COUNT
An accurate estimate of the number of documents, document size, document
characteristics and condition is critical to determining the project manpower,
hardware, and software requirements. Vagueness or guestimates may lead to
overpricing.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. What is the total number of pages (paper, film, electronic) to be converted?
a. Number of boxes and box size?
b. Number of shelf feet?
c. Number of file cabinets and drawers?
2. Are pages one-sided or two-sided - what percentage of each?
3. What are the page sizes?
a. Sticky note or note card?
b. Letter size?
c. Legal size?
d. Tabloid?
e. Engineering? C? D? E? Rolled, folded or flat?
4. Are there any photographs and what size? Color or B/W?
5. Is there color on any documents that needs to be captured?
6. Are there hand writing/annotations on any documents to be captured?
7. Will new pages be added during the scanning period?

DOCUMENT PREPARATION AND RE-ASSEMBLY
We must know exactly how the documents are to be handled to determine the
required manpower and level of expertise.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. Who will be responsible for document preparation and what specific aspects
of preparation will be completed?
2. Will pages not to be scanned have to be handled or will they be pulled?
3. Are sticky notes / note cards to be scanned individually?
4. Will documents require removal from binders/folders? Are the documents
stapled or clipped? Are documents taped together?
5. Are there any onion-skin or carbon-paper documents?
6. What are the requirements if a document is not readable or in very poor
physical or legible condition?
7. Will there be appropriate staff available to respond to document handling
questions?
8. Are there any documents to be re-assembled? To what degree (back in folder,
stapled back together, re-bound)?

PAPER CONDITION
The quality and consistency of the paper, documents and boxes help determine
the degree of document preparation and ease of scanning?

CONSIDERATIONS
1. What percentage of the pages are not on bond stock?
2. Are the documents all of one type or are they intermixed in a single file?
3. Are any documents from perforated forms?
4. Are any of the documents bound and if so, how?
5. What percentage of the pages are sticky notes, note cards, receipts or any
other non-standard document sizes?
6. What percentage of the documents are dog-eared, torn, crumpled or damaged?
7. What percentage of the documents are stapled, clipped or fastened?

PAGE NUMBERING OR BATES STAMPING
The ability to retrieve documents based on their page number or Bates stamp may
contribute to the overall utility and ease of use of your project.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. Do scanned pages need to be number stamped or otherwise identified?
2. Do pages need Bates stamping?

INDEXING
Indexing is the process of assigning data elements (name, SSN, account, date, etc.)
to a document to speed later retrieval. This data is keystroked into each record as provided by your firm. The amount to be indexed, the complexity and the source are important.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. What index fields are required at each level (folder / document)?
2. What is the average length of each field?
3. Are the fields alpha, numeric, or alpha-numeric?
4. What is the data source for each index field?
5. Will entering the index data require an inspection of each image scanned?
6. Can index items be selected from pull-down lists or tables?
7. Will reference to the original document be required for indexing?
8. Will the indexing permit OCR (optical character recognition) or MSR (mark
sense recognition) of the images?
9. Can index data be populated from an existing database?
10. How many fields need to be verified by double-blind keying?
11. Will further indexing occur after scanning?

OUTPUT
Paperless Imaging Services can provide various levels of intelligent data retrieval using
optical character recognition. Typical industry output is 90-95%. This means out of
100 pages 5 are not legible. Our OCR approaches perfection at 99.99% accuracy.
Your specific needs dictate our level of OCR.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. Will the ability to find every word on every document be significant to the case involved?
2. Can some groups of documents be OCR'd at different levels?
3. Does any of the project involve scanning for archival purposes only?

QUALITY CONTROL / QUALITY ASSURANCE
Paperless Imaging Services will deliver your project at the quality level you require (both images and indexed fields) as well as document re-assembly if required.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. Will quality control occur after scanning or after indexing? Or both?
2. Will the quality control level be a every page or every 10th or every 50th or other?
3. What attributes of the scanned image will be checked under quality control - overall
image quality? image skew? image rotation? image cropping/border removal?
4. What measures will be required to assure index field accuracy?

Back to Top







Guide to Selecting the Right Document Conversion Contractor
Selecting a Document Conversion Vendor
When selecting a Scanning Service Bureau (vendor) for the document conversion
process, law firms must consider the essential components of the contractual agreement. If the agreement contains the essential components, disagreements, gaps in expectations and problems will be minimized. Look for a vendor that is one you are comfortable in forming a long-term business relationship with. Considerations for you as the client include - Are you satisfied with the services? Are expectations and the need for confidentiality being met? What type of screening process do the vendor's employees go through? Is the basic software easily updated and available independent of the vendor?

The basic, essential elements that must be considered by a law firm:

Pre-Conversion Plan
Should, as a minimum, address:
The current workflow and usage of documents to be converted; type, condition, and quantity of documents to be converted; a comprehensive index system jointly developed by your firm and the vendor; determination of the output format of converted documents; current and future hardware/software requirements and capabilities;
a conversion timeline and proposed workflow modifications.

Pricing options
Determine whether pricing is all inclusive or a la carte
Often the initial a la carte estimate may balloon (or increase) after all required
steps not initially priced are taken in to account. At a minimum, all inclusive”
pricing should include document preparation, scanning, indexing, production and
delivery of CD master sets, and temporary document storage. Additional items
that must be considered are; document pickup, training and installation, document
disposition (return or destruction) and any required hardware/software upgrades.
Fluctuation in the number of documents to be converted should be expected as
estimates are just that - estimates. However, hidden, add on costs should not be
accepted.

Access to Records
Does the contract provide for reasonable access to records during conversion?
If you need a critical file/document, will they ensure you get it and will there be a
charge for retrieval and delivery?

What is the level of Document Security/Confidentiality?
Does the vendor provide protection for stored documents? What type of screening
process do the vendor's employees go through prior to being hired? Do they do
background checks to include criminal, credit and controlled substance checks?

How do you determine the Quality of Service provided?
Will the service provider provide Client references and/or the opportunity for the
new client to talk to those clients already employing the conversion process technology?

What is the Timetable for entire conversion process?
Will the vendor work within your needs and develop a timetable that minimizes disruption to your workflow?

Back to Top

Thank you for considering Paperless Imaging Services for your litigation support. "10 Things your Legal Document Management Team needs To Know Now"

"Document Conversion Guidelines"

"Volume Estimation Guide"

"Paperless Imaging Services Catalog"

"Cost comparisons in Legal Discovery"

"Guide to Selecting the Right Document Conversion Contractor"

Each of these articles can be found below....




10 Things your Legal Document Management Team needs to Know Now
1. A carefully defined objective must be established with the input of law firm attorneys and consultation from an experienced legal services contractor.

2. The top three priorites for the firm must be defined. Consider accuracy, timing, logistics, staff utilization, budget, judicial requirements, and storage/duplication needs.

3. Do not select a document conversion contractor until you have done your homework. Understand the project in its entirety and the details of the project workflow.

4. Limit your contractor selection to established businesses which specialize in working with law firms. Provide a consistent scope of work.

5. The pricing for complex paper scanning projects will involve several unique elements. A "one price fits all" contractor estimate will lead to problems at completion.

6. The pricing for paper scanning can range from $.02 to $1.00 a page based on the requirements of the project.

7. The items that cause your contractor the greatest difficulty include onsite work in tight areas, poorly packaged paper, poor condition paper, paper not sequentially delivered or readily available, onion-skin and carbon paper, irregular sized paper, folded paper, fragile paper, colored pencil/pen markups, poor indexing systems, 99.99% OCR accuracy, short time-frames, lack of communication, lack of client knowledge.

8. You can save your law firm money by providing vendors with detailed descriptions of the project including volumes, types, samples, photos, and accurate project scopes of work.

9. Paper scanning contractors generally classify projects as high-volume, low accuracy archival projects and low-volume, high accuracy projects and price accordingly. Look for high accuracy if you wish to receive a reliable product that has real value towards winning your law suit.

10. Contractors that have provided high quality paper scanning for litigation purposes in the past will understand your requirements and know how to satisfy them.

Back to Top





Document Conversion Guidelines
by Paperless Imaging Services

The considerations to be made by your law firm prior to the initiation of a document conversion project should be divided into the various aspects of the project. These include:
Document Logistics
Document Count
Document Preparation and Re-assembly
Paper Condition
Page Numbering or Bates Stamping
Indexing
Output
Quality Control / Quality Assurance

Document Logistics
It is important that the handling of the group of documents be evaluated in order to preserve and protect their integrity. Considerations include location of the documents and their organization; who will do any required organization; where will documents be stored; are there security considerations; is there microfilm/microfiche; can the documents be stored on-site for a long period; can the project be done on-site?

Document Count
An accurate estimate of the number of documents, document size, document
characteristics and condition is critical to determining the project manpower,
hardware, and software requirements. Vagueness or guestimates may lead to
overpricing. Consideration should be given to the total number of pages to be converted, whether by number of boxes, amount of shelving used, or number of file cabinet drawers; the number of documents single or double-sided; the size of the pages; any photographs and color or b/w; color scanning requirements; hand-writing capture; changes in the page count during the project.

Document Preparation and Re-assembly
You must determine the documents are to be handled to determine the
required manpower and level of expertise. Consider staff responsibilities for document preparation; handling of pages not to be scanned; scanning of sticky notes; document de-stapling, removal from binders/folders; any onion-skin or carbon paper documents; how to deal with poor quality originals; document preparation supervision; and re-assembly of documents.

Paper Condition
The quality and consistency of the paper, documents and boxes help determine
the degree of document preparation and ease of scanning? You will need to determine if all the paper is bond stock; if all documents are the same type; if there are any perforated forms or bound documents; are there damaged documents; and how many documents are stapled, clipped or fastened.

Page numbering
The ability to retrieve documents based on their page number or Bates stamp may
contribute to the overall utility and ease of use of your project. Determine if scanned pages need number or Bates stamping.

Indexing
Indexing is the process of assigning data elements (name, SSN, account, date, etc.)
to a document to speed later retrieval. This data is keystroked into each record as provided
by your firm. The amount to be indexed, the complexity and the source are important. Consider what index fields are required; the length of those fields; the type of data to be input; the source of the index data; if the indexing can be automated; and what level of accuracy is required (double-blind).

Output
Various levels of intelligent data retrieval using optical character recognition can be accomplished. Typical industry output is 90-95%. This means out of 100 pages 5 are not legible. A limited number of systems/vendors have approached perfection at 99.99% accuracy.Your specific needs dictate the level of OCR. You will need to determine how many words per page are critical; do some groups of pages require higher OCR accuracy; can some pages be simply scanned for storage.

Qualty Control / Quality Assurance
Each project demands different levels of quality control/ quality assurance. It is important that these levels be firmly established prior to the start of the project. Consider when the quality control/assurance measures occur, how often, by whom; what attributes of the scanned image will be checked; will the indexed fields be checked.

The development of a document conversion project requires extensive planning by those in charge. Training of the personnel is mandatory. Experience with similar projects is invaluable. As you consider a document conversion project as part of your litigation strategy you are encouraged to consult a support service that specializes in supporting the efforts of the legal profession. Paperless Imaging Services can help. It's all we do.

Back to Top







Volume Estimation Guidelines

The following will provide some assistance as you estimate the size and complexity of your paper scanning project:

Unbound paper equals approximately 150-175 pages per inch

A four-drawer vertical file cabinet holds approximately 12,000-16,000 pages

A lateral file cabinet holds approximately 5,500-6000 pages per drawer

A 12 x 15 "file box" holds approximately 2000-2500 pages

A "Bankers box" holds approximately 4500-5000 pages

A lineal foot of shelving holds approximately 1500-2000 pages

Color photos stacked count approximately 100-120 photos per inch

Engineering drawings (unfolded/unrolled) count approximately 125-150 sheets per inch

A 1" 3-ring binder holds approximately 250-275 pages

A 2" 3-ring binder holds approximately 450-480 pages

A 3" 3-ring binder holds approximately 650-670 pages

A 2-hole 2" binder holds approximately 450-480 pages

A "Velo-binder" holds approximately 200-300 pages per inch

Plastic coil / spiral binders hold approximately 175-200 pages

A 16 mm 24 X roll of microfilm holds approximately 2000-2400 pages

A 35 mm 12 X roll of microfilm holds approximately 1000 pages

A sheet of microfiche 24 X holds approximately 100 pages

Aperture cards count approximately 125-135 cards per inch

Back to Top








Paperless Imaging Services Catalog

Electronic Discovery Services
If you are preparing for initial electronic discovery, or going to trial, Paperless Imaging Services makes it easy by approaching each project with experience and innovation. Using our litigation support best practices approach, we can consult and review the special needs of your electronic discovery project, and suggest cost-saving ideas by utilizing our proven professional strengths.

Litigation Support Systems
Paperless Imaging Services can provide your law firm with electronic discovery, computer forensics, online hosting, litigation consulting and a project management skill set. We make collecting, reviewing and processing your electronic discovery data easy.

Our solutions to your litigation support needs:

- Enhanced electronic discovery

* Document analysis
* Scope of project review
* Detailed reporting
* Deliverables based on needs
* Data culling
* Removal of duplicates
* Annotations
* Resolution adjustments
* Cropping
* Watermarks
* Rotation
* Black Border Removal
* Deskewing
* Line Removal
* Noise removal
* Inverting (Polarity)
* Despeckle
* Mirror

- Searching and filtering

* Processing per your criteria
* Date/time selection/file extension/size selection
* Various search capabilities for captured text:
* Full text/phrase search
* Boolean search capabilities and constraints
* Wildcards
* Word stemming
* Adjustable Fuzzy search
* Phonic search
* Proximity and Directed Proximity search
* Stemming
* Numeric range
* Concept/Synonym/Thesaurus search
* Relevancy Ranking
* Term weighting
* Compound searching
* Forensics filtering


- Flexible deliverables: TIFF, PDF, native, metadata, text
- Data integration with document review systems
- Online Repositories
- Document Review and Screening
- Project Management

* Consultation
* Detailed project scope review
* Setup of culling criteria
* Document preparation and handling criteria
* Document re-assembly and delivery criteria

- Data Conversion with uniform printing & review formats
- Document Imaging (scanning to pdf/tiff/text plus image / bw, gray or color
- Document re-assembly/coding/labeling
- Document printing
- Document storage on CD/DVD
- On-Site or at Regional Center

Back to Top





Cost comparisons in Legal Discovery

DOCUMENT LOGISTICS
It is important that the handling of the group of documents be evaluated
in order to preserve and protect their integrity.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. What is the location of the original documents (paper/film/files) and
how will they be organized?
2. Who will do the organization of the original documents? Where?
3. Where will the documents be stored/staged prior to scanning?
4. Are there security considerations for the documents?
5. If there is microfilm/microfiche, are there environmental or
film quality considerations?
6. Is there sufficient space on-site for document preparation and batching
if it is to be done on-site?
7. Is there sufficient space on-site for document storage during scanning,
re-assembly, quality control, quality assurance and approval?

DOCUMENT COUNT
An accurate estimate of the number of documents, document size, document
characteristics and condition is critical to determining the project manpower,
hardware, and software requirements. Vagueness or guestimates may lead to
overpricing.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. What is the total number of pages (paper, film, electronic) to be converted?
a. Number of boxes and box size?
b. Number of shelf feet?
c. Number of file cabinets and drawers?
2. Are pages one-sided or two-sided - what percentage of each?
3. What are the page sizes?
a. Sticky note or note card?
b. Letter size?
c. Legal size?
d. Tabloid?
e. Engineering? C? D? E? Rolled, folded or flat?
4. Are there any photographs and what size? Color or B/W?
5. Is there color on any documents that needs to be captured?
6. Are there hand writing/annotations on any documents to be captured?
7. Will new pages be added during the scanning period?

DOCUMENT PREPARATION AND RE-ASSEMBLY
We must know exactly how the documents are to be handled to determine the
required manpower and level of expertise.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. Who will be responsible for document preparation and what specific aspects
of preparation will be completed?
2. Will pages not to be scanned have to be handled or will they be pulled?
3. Are sticky notes / note cards to be scanned individually?
4. Will documents require removal from binders/folders? Are the documents
stapled or clipped? Are documents taped together?
5. Are there any onion-skin or carbon-paper documents?
6. What are the requirements if a document is not readable or in very poor
physical or legible condition?
7. Will there be appropriate staff available to respond to document handling
questions?
8. Are there any documents to be re-assembled? To what degree (back in folder,
stapled back together, re-bound)?

PAPER CONDITION
The quality and consistency of the paper, documents and boxes help determine
the degree of document preparation and ease of scanning?

CONSIDERATIONS
1. What percentage of the pages are not on bond stock?
2. Are the documents all of one type or are they intermixed in a single file?
3. Are any documents from perforated forms?
4. Are any of the documents bound and if so, how?
5. What percentage of the pages are sticky notes, note cards, receipts or any
other non-standard document sizes?
6. What percentage of the documents are dog-eared, torn, crumpled or damaged?
7. What percentage of the documents are stapled, clipped or fastened?

PAGE NUMBERING OR BATES STAMPING
The ability to retrieve documents based on their page number or Bates stamp may
contribute to the overall utility and ease of use of your project.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. Do scanned pages need to be number stamped or otherwise identified?
2. Do pages need Bates stamping?

INDEXING
Indexing is the process of assigning data elements (name, SSN, account, date, etc.)
to a document to speed later retrieval. This data is keystroked into each record as provided by your firm. The amount to be indexed, the complexity and the source are important.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. What index fields are required at each level (folder / document)?
2. What is the average length of each field?
3. Are the fields alpha, numeric, or alpha-numeric?
4. What is the data source for each index field?
5. Will entering the index data require an inspection of each image scanned?
6. Can index items be selected from pull-down lists or tables?
7. Will reference to the original document be required for indexing?
8. Will the indexing permit OCR (optical character recognition) or MSR (mark
sense recognition) of the images?
9. Can index data be populated from an existing database?
10. How many fields need to be verified by double-blind keying?
11. Will further indexing occur after scanning?

OUTPUT
Paperless Imaging Services can provide various levels of intelligent data retrieval using
optical character recognition. Typical industry output is 90-95%. This means out of
100 pages 5 are not legible. Our OCR approaches perfection at 99.99% accuracy.
Your specific needs dictate our level of OCR.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. Will the ability to find every word on every document be significant to the case involved?
2. Can some groups of documents be OCR'd at different levels?
3. Does any of the project involve scanning for archival purposes only?

QUALITY CONTROL / QUALITY ASSURANCE
Paperless Imaging Services will deliver your project at the quality level you require (both images and indexed fields) as well as document re-assembly if required.

CONSIDERATIONS
1. Will quality control occur after scanning or after indexing? Or both?
2. Will the quality control level be a every page or every 10th or every 50th or other?
3. What attributes of the scanned image will be checked under quality control - overall
image quality? image skew? image rotation? image cropping/border removal?
4. What measures will be required to assure index field accuracy?

Back to Top







Guide to Selecting the Right Document Conversion Contractor
Selecting a Document Conversion Vendor
When selecting a Scanning Service Bureau (vendor) for the document conversion
process, law firms must consider the essential components of the contractual agreement. If the agreement contains the essential components, disagreements, gaps in expectations and problems will be minimized. Look for a vendor that is one you are comfortable in forming a long-term business relationship with. Considerations for you as the client include - Are you satisfied with the services? Are expectations and the need for confidentiality being met? What type of screening process do the vendor's employees go through? Is the basic software easily updated and available independent of the vendor?

The basic, essential elements that must be considered by a law firm:

Pre-Conversion Plan
Should, as a minimum, address:
The current workflow and usage of documents to be converted; type, condition, and quantity of documents to be converted; a comprehensive index system jointly developed by your firm and the vendor; determination of the output format of converted documents; current and future hardware/software requirements and capabilities;
a conversion timeline and proposed workflow modifications.

Pricing options
Determine whether pricing is all inclusive or a la carte
Often the initial a la carte estimate may balloon (or increase) after all required
steps not initially priced are taken in to account. At a minimum, all inclusive”
pricing should include document preparation, scanning, indexing, production and
delivery of CD master sets, and temporary document storage. Additional items
that must be considered are; document pickup, training and installation, document
disposition (return or destruction) and any required hardware/software upgrades.
Fluctuation in the number of documents to be converted should be expected as
estimates are just that - estimates. However, hidden, add on costs should not be
accepted.

Access to Records
Does the contract provide for reasonable access to records during conversion?
If you need a critical file/document, will they ensure you get it and will there be a
charge for retrieval and delivery?

What is the level of Document Security/Confidentiality?
Does the vendor provide protection for stored documents? What type of screening
process do the vendor's employees go through prior to being hired? Do they do
background checks to include criminal, credit and controlled substance checks?

How do you determine the Quality of Service provided?
Will the service provider provide Client references and/or the opportunity for the
new client to talk to those clients already employing the conversion process technology?

What is the Timetable for entire conversion process?
Will the vendor work within your needs and develop a timetable that minimizes disruption to your workflow?

Back to Top

Thank you for considering Paperless Imaging Services for your litigation support.